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New Scientist

Feb 26 2022
Magazine

New Scientist covers the latest developments in science and technology that will impact your world. New Scientist employs and commissions the best writers in their fields from all over the world. Our editorial team provide cutting-edge news, award-winning features and reports, written in concise and clear language that puts discoveries and advances in the context of everyday life today and in the future.

Elsewhere on New Scientist

The long covid dividend • Research into the syndrome could help others with similarly mysterious conditions

New Scientist

England ends covid-19 rules • Mandatory self-isolation ends in England as the country scraps its remaining coronavirus laws, reports Adam Vaughan

The day the floods came • Devastating floods in Germany last year have left deep scars that serve as a grim portent of Europe’s climate future, reports Adam Vaughan from the Ahr valley

A road map for adaptation

Rats can track the passage of time and judge their accuracy

Covering plants with red plastic boosts crop yields

Lung changed to new blood type is a step towards universal donor organs

Driverless car photos used to create virtual San Francisco

A substitute for whale poo • Whaling left oceans with less of the animals’ faeces, which drives algal blooms that lock away carbon. Now scientists are trying to mimic this process, reports Adam Vaughan

Ancient ‘fossil’ virus found in the human genome

Crackdown on cryptocurrencies • The launch of specialist teams to tackle blockchain crimes and scams shows the issue has become too big to ignore, says Chris Stokel-Walker

We may be unable to grow new brain cells after we enter adulthood

Map of pain neurons may lead to more effective drugs

AI brings fusion power closer • Tech firm DeepMind has created a neural network that keeps the super-hot plasma inside a fusion reactor under control, reports Matthew Sparkes

DNA reveals if drinking water is safe • An engineered version of the double helix forms part of a device for detecting pollutants

Invasive poisonous toads may be killing Madagascan snakes

Oil giants accused of greenwashing over clean-energy switch

Time dilation seen on smallest scale ever in an atomic clock

Orangutans turn out to be naturals at using stone tools

Croc-like dinosaur’s never-ending teeth

Swipe right if you like my immune system

Really brief

Abortion opposition is flexible in the US

Lost tales of age of chivalry quantified thanks to ecology

AI removes tattoos for face recognition

Failure of imagination • Creative thinking is at the heart of science, so why is there a lack of it when communicating some crucial findings, asks Hannah Cloke

No planet B • Drowning in a sea of plastic Are we on the verge of a global initiative to clean up ocean plastics, or is it just more blah, blah, blah, asks Graham Lawton

Bedevilled Mars

A matter of perception • The astonishing way that some people’s brains interpret the world offers an insight into how we all experience reality, says Carissa Wong

Double or quits • The downsides of cloning turn out to be less amusing than this genre-defying film intended, says Davide Abbatescianni

Don’t miss

Work-life balance? • What if you could forget work when you leave the office and leave home troubles behind when you return? It may not end well, finds Bethan Ackerley

Your letters

Long-haul fight • As normal life resumes for many people, millions of others are still battling long covid. At last the condition is finally getting the attention – and potentially treatments – it so desperately needs, finds Michael Marshall

TREATMENT TRIALS • With a lack of...


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Frequency: Weekly Pages: 60 Publisher: New Scientist Ltd Edition: Feb 26 2022

OverDrive Magazine

  • Release date: February 24, 2022

Formats

OverDrive Magazine

subjects

Science

Languages

English

New Scientist covers the latest developments in science and technology that will impact your world. New Scientist employs and commissions the best writers in their fields from all over the world. Our editorial team provide cutting-edge news, award-winning features and reports, written in concise and clear language that puts discoveries and advances in the context of everyday life today and in the future.

Elsewhere on New Scientist

The long covid dividend • Research into the syndrome could help others with similarly mysterious conditions

New Scientist

England ends covid-19 rules • Mandatory self-isolation ends in England as the country scraps its remaining coronavirus laws, reports Adam Vaughan

The day the floods came • Devastating floods in Germany last year have left deep scars that serve as a grim portent of Europe’s climate future, reports Adam Vaughan from the Ahr valley

A road map for adaptation

Rats can track the passage of time and judge their accuracy

Covering plants with red plastic boosts crop yields

Lung changed to new blood type is a step towards universal donor organs

Driverless car photos used to create virtual San Francisco

A substitute for whale poo • Whaling left oceans with less of the animals’ faeces, which drives algal blooms that lock away carbon. Now scientists are trying to mimic this process, reports Adam Vaughan

Ancient ‘fossil’ virus found in the human genome

Crackdown on cryptocurrencies • The launch of specialist teams to tackle blockchain crimes and scams shows the issue has become too big to ignore, says Chris Stokel-Walker

We may be unable to grow new brain cells after we enter adulthood

Map of pain neurons may lead to more effective drugs

AI brings fusion power closer • Tech firm DeepMind has created a neural network that keeps the super-hot plasma inside a fusion reactor under control, reports Matthew Sparkes

DNA reveals if drinking water is safe • An engineered version of the double helix forms part of a device for detecting pollutants

Invasive poisonous toads may be killing Madagascan snakes

Oil giants accused of greenwashing over clean-energy switch

Time dilation seen on smallest scale ever in an atomic clock

Orangutans turn out to be naturals at using stone tools

Croc-like dinosaur’s never-ending teeth

Swipe right if you like my immune system

Really brief

Abortion opposition is flexible in the US

Lost tales of age of chivalry quantified thanks to ecology

AI removes tattoos for face recognition

Failure of imagination • Creative thinking is at the heart of science, so why is there a lack of it when communicating some crucial findings, asks Hannah Cloke

No planet B • Drowning in a sea of plastic Are we on the verge of a global initiative to clean up ocean plastics, or is it just more blah, blah, blah, asks Graham Lawton

Bedevilled Mars

A matter of perception • The astonishing way that some people’s brains interpret the world offers an insight into how we all experience reality, says Carissa Wong

Double or quits • The downsides of cloning turn out to be less amusing than this genre-defying film intended, says Davide Abbatescianni

Don’t miss

Work-life balance? • What if you could forget work when you leave the office and leave home troubles behind when you return? It may not end well, finds Bethan Ackerley

Your letters

Long-haul fight • As normal life resumes for many people, millions of others are still battling long covid. At last the condition is finally getting the attention – and potentially treatments – it so desperately needs, finds Michael Marshall

TREATMENT TRIALS • With a lack of...


Expand title description text