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New Scientist

Mar 05 2022
Magazine

New Scientist covers the latest developments in science and technology that will impact your world. New Scientist employs and commissions the best writers in their fields from all over the world. Our editorial team provide cutting-edge news, award-winning features and reports, written in concise and clear language that puts discoveries and advances in the context of everyday life today and in the future.

Elsewhere on New Scientist

A note from the editor

Chemical solutions • Chemistry contributes to many environmental woes, but it can help fight them too

New Scientist

The ultimate warning • With the invasion of Ukraine ongoing, there is a real risk of Russia using a nuclear weapon as a show of force, finds Matthew Sparkes

Humanitarian crisis in Ukraine • People in Ukraine face a loss of healthcare and clean water that could cause a rise in infectious disease, reports Clare Wilson, with some hospitals already out of oxygen

European Mars rover may be delayed by Russian sanctions

European countries and companies are cutting energy ties to Russia

Analysis Cyberwarfare • The digital battleground Russia has a reputation for its ability to wage war online by spreading disinformation and launching cyberattacks, but this time it seems to be faltering, says Chris Stokel-Walker

It will be increasingly difficult to adapt to a warming world, but it’s not too late

Field notes El Salvador • The world’s first bitcoin republic El Salvador’s adoption of the cryptocurrency has attracted enthusiastic tourists, concern from financial institutions and scorn from locals, reports Luke Taylor

Omega-3 supplements could cut the number of preterm births

Slug faeces help mushrooms start new colonies

Was T. rex actually three separate species?

Dogs show grief when other dogs they live with die

Largest ever family tree of humanity reveals history of our species

Price tag rises for UK’s planned nuclear waste facility

Antibiotics on crops may harm the ability of bees to find food

Analysis Space junk • Whose rocket is about to hit the moon? A chunk of space junk will hit the lunar surface this week and it is troubling that no one is admitting responsibility, finds Jonathan O’Callaghan

Extra competition has made UK baby boomers the unhappiest generation

Art of paper cutting inspires light yet strong material

Edible wild plants could help address global malnutrition

Skewed black hole is a real space oddity

Gorilla faces warped by lots of inbreeding

Really brief

Cleaning an office makes dirty air

Dogs trump cats in helping people stay fit as they age

Hyper neurons may lead to poor slumber

The trees of life • Forest ecosystems are under threat and replanting isn’t enough. We need to understand them to save them, says Jingjing Liang

This changes everything • Web3 is a fantasy, but it can still hurt you The complexity and hype about the next, decentralised phase of the internet is increasingly breeding scams, writes Annalee Newitz

Undersea beds

Your letters

Battle of the smarts • In a world where artificial intelligence seems to be ready to take over, human common sense is far from obsolete, finds Chen Ly

A sexy singularity • Bigbug presents a strange and colourful world awash with predictable gags and innuendo, says Gregory Wakeman

Don’t miss

The games column • Post-pandemic zombies The apocalypse can be fun when you have parkour skills to help you explore your surroundings and escape the bad guys. But a lifeless storyline left me as cold as one of the undead, says Jacob Aron

Chemistry to change the world • Niftier ways to manipulate molecules are bringing us advances on...


Expand title description text
Frequency: Weekly Pages: 60 Publisher: New Scientist Ltd Edition: Mar 05 2022

OverDrive Magazine

  • Release date: March 3, 2022

Formats

OverDrive Magazine

subjects

Science

Languages

English

New Scientist covers the latest developments in science and technology that will impact your world. New Scientist employs and commissions the best writers in their fields from all over the world. Our editorial team provide cutting-edge news, award-winning features and reports, written in concise and clear language that puts discoveries and advances in the context of everyday life today and in the future.

Elsewhere on New Scientist

A note from the editor

Chemical solutions • Chemistry contributes to many environmental woes, but it can help fight them too

New Scientist

The ultimate warning • With the invasion of Ukraine ongoing, there is a real risk of Russia using a nuclear weapon as a show of force, finds Matthew Sparkes

Humanitarian crisis in Ukraine • People in Ukraine face a loss of healthcare and clean water that could cause a rise in infectious disease, reports Clare Wilson, with some hospitals already out of oxygen

European Mars rover may be delayed by Russian sanctions

European countries and companies are cutting energy ties to Russia

Analysis Cyberwarfare • The digital battleground Russia has a reputation for its ability to wage war online by spreading disinformation and launching cyberattacks, but this time it seems to be faltering, says Chris Stokel-Walker

It will be increasingly difficult to adapt to a warming world, but it’s not too late

Field notes El Salvador • The world’s first bitcoin republic El Salvador’s adoption of the cryptocurrency has attracted enthusiastic tourists, concern from financial institutions and scorn from locals, reports Luke Taylor

Omega-3 supplements could cut the number of preterm births

Slug faeces help mushrooms start new colonies

Was T. rex actually three separate species?

Dogs show grief when other dogs they live with die

Largest ever family tree of humanity reveals history of our species

Price tag rises for UK’s planned nuclear waste facility

Antibiotics on crops may harm the ability of bees to find food

Analysis Space junk • Whose rocket is about to hit the moon? A chunk of space junk will hit the lunar surface this week and it is troubling that no one is admitting responsibility, finds Jonathan O’Callaghan

Extra competition has made UK baby boomers the unhappiest generation

Art of paper cutting inspires light yet strong material

Edible wild plants could help address global malnutrition

Skewed black hole is a real space oddity

Gorilla faces warped by lots of inbreeding

Really brief

Cleaning an office makes dirty air

Dogs trump cats in helping people stay fit as they age

Hyper neurons may lead to poor slumber

The trees of life • Forest ecosystems are under threat and replanting isn’t enough. We need to understand them to save them, says Jingjing Liang

This changes everything • Web3 is a fantasy, but it can still hurt you The complexity and hype about the next, decentralised phase of the internet is increasingly breeding scams, writes Annalee Newitz

Undersea beds

Your letters

Battle of the smarts • In a world where artificial intelligence seems to be ready to take over, human common sense is far from obsolete, finds Chen Ly

A sexy singularity • Bigbug presents a strange and colourful world awash with predictable gags and innuendo, says Gregory Wakeman

Don’t miss

The games column • Post-pandemic zombies The apocalypse can be fun when you have parkour skills to help you explore your surroundings and escape the bad guys. But a lifeless storyline left me as cold as one of the undead, says Jacob Aron

Chemistry to change the world • Niftier ways to manipulate molecules are bringing us advances on...


Expand title description text