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New Scientist

Mar 19 2022
Magazine

New Scientist covers the latest developments in science and technology that will impact your world. New Scientist employs and commissions the best writers in their fields from all over the world. Our editorial team provide cutting-edge news, award-winning features and reports, written in concise and clear language that puts discoveries and advances in the context of everyday life today and in the future.

Elsewhere on New Scientist

Phoney war • The internet is a key battleground between truth and lies about the Ukraine invasion

New Scientist

Ukraine’s nuclear peril • Russian forces have threatened safety at nuclear power plants, but a serious incident is considered unlikely, says Matthew Sparkes

How to fight disinformation • Researchers and fact checkers are debunking a huge amount of online propaganda and fake news about the Russian invasion of Ukraine, reports Chris Stokel-Walker

Why hasn’t Russia waged an all-out cyberwar against Ukraine?

How to ease global food shock • The US and Europe could compensate for the loss of Ukraine’s grain exports by scrapping biofuel mandates, reports Michael Le Page

Clue to the rejuvenating effects of young blood

Even a low level of light at night may disrupt blood sugar

Organic mineral bonanza on Mars • NASA’s Curiosity rover has found more potential signs of ancient life

The slow speed of sound on Mars has been measured

Moon’s emergence from planet crash reconstructed

Double-shadowed craters could hold ice on the moon

Iceland targets herd immunity • The country’s new covid-19 strategy aims for “widespread societal resistance” to the virus, but most experts think this cannot be achieved, reports Clare Wilson

Pink lake mystery solved • DNA sequencing identifies microbes that colour Australian landmark

Crash-avoiding drones can fly in mines

Common toads surprise biologists by climbing trees

A simple maths trick makes training AI more efficient

Extinct species will stay extinct • An effort to reconstruct the genome of the Christmas Island rat suggests we will never be able to resurrect lost animals just as they were, finds Michael Le Page

AI can help historians restore ancient Greek texts

Electric field aids kidneys kept on ice

‘Breathing’ pillow helps reduce anxiety

Really brief

Your organs may age at different rates

Recurring UTIs may be prevented with an antiseptic

Fossil gharial solves crocodile mystery

What’s in a sneeze? • As covid-19 restrictions end, there is a moral duty to adjust our attitudes towards the spread of disease, says Jonathan Goodman

Field notes from space-time • Who is space for? Billionaires fuelling a new space race are having a big say in what happens to the night sky. But space belongs to everyone, writes Chanda Prescod-Weinstein

In the pink

Your letters

Flying into disaster • When we fasten our seatbelts, we put our trust in aviation companies to keep us safe. But what if they are more interested in profit, asks Elle Hunt

Keeping up appearances • Living an online life can be a dream come true, but it is all too often a nightmare, finds Chris Stokel-Walker

Don’t miss

The film column • Reach for the stars We have made a mess of Earth, but does that mean we should head for space and have another go? There are many reasons not to, and not all of them come down to technical difficulties, finds Simon Ings

Wave after wave • By observing dozens of gravitational waves – and spotting completely new kinds – we are solving some of the universe’s deepest puzzles, reports Stuart Clark

OUT OF THIS WORLD

Save our bunnies • A mysterious viral disease is putting rabbits in a...


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Frequency: Weekly Pages: 60 Publisher: New Scientist Ltd Edition: Mar 19 2022

OverDrive Magazine

  • Release date: March 17, 2022

Formats

OverDrive Magazine

subjects

Science

Languages

English

New Scientist covers the latest developments in science and technology that will impact your world. New Scientist employs and commissions the best writers in their fields from all over the world. Our editorial team provide cutting-edge news, award-winning features and reports, written in concise and clear language that puts discoveries and advances in the context of everyday life today and in the future.

Elsewhere on New Scientist

Phoney war • The internet is a key battleground between truth and lies about the Ukraine invasion

New Scientist

Ukraine’s nuclear peril • Russian forces have threatened safety at nuclear power plants, but a serious incident is considered unlikely, says Matthew Sparkes

How to fight disinformation • Researchers and fact checkers are debunking a huge amount of online propaganda and fake news about the Russian invasion of Ukraine, reports Chris Stokel-Walker

Why hasn’t Russia waged an all-out cyberwar against Ukraine?

How to ease global food shock • The US and Europe could compensate for the loss of Ukraine’s grain exports by scrapping biofuel mandates, reports Michael Le Page

Clue to the rejuvenating effects of young blood

Even a low level of light at night may disrupt blood sugar

Organic mineral bonanza on Mars • NASA’s Curiosity rover has found more potential signs of ancient life

The slow speed of sound on Mars has been measured

Moon’s emergence from planet crash reconstructed

Double-shadowed craters could hold ice on the moon

Iceland targets herd immunity • The country’s new covid-19 strategy aims for “widespread societal resistance” to the virus, but most experts think this cannot be achieved, reports Clare Wilson

Pink lake mystery solved • DNA sequencing identifies microbes that colour Australian landmark

Crash-avoiding drones can fly in mines

Common toads surprise biologists by climbing trees

A simple maths trick makes training AI more efficient

Extinct species will stay extinct • An effort to reconstruct the genome of the Christmas Island rat suggests we will never be able to resurrect lost animals just as they were, finds Michael Le Page

AI can help historians restore ancient Greek texts

Electric field aids kidneys kept on ice

‘Breathing’ pillow helps reduce anxiety

Really brief

Your organs may age at different rates

Recurring UTIs may be prevented with an antiseptic

Fossil gharial solves crocodile mystery

What’s in a sneeze? • As covid-19 restrictions end, there is a moral duty to adjust our attitudes towards the spread of disease, says Jonathan Goodman

Field notes from space-time • Who is space for? Billionaires fuelling a new space race are having a big say in what happens to the night sky. But space belongs to everyone, writes Chanda Prescod-Weinstein

In the pink

Your letters

Flying into disaster • When we fasten our seatbelts, we put our trust in aviation companies to keep us safe. But what if they are more interested in profit, asks Elle Hunt

Keeping up appearances • Living an online life can be a dream come true, but it is all too often a nightmare, finds Chris Stokel-Walker

Don’t miss

The film column • Reach for the stars We have made a mess of Earth, but does that mean we should head for space and have another go? There are many reasons not to, and not all of them come down to technical difficulties, finds Simon Ings

Wave after wave • By observing dozens of gravitational waves – and spotting completely new kinds – we are solving some of the universe’s deepest puzzles, reports Stuart Clark

OUT OF THIS WORLD

Save our bunnies • A mysterious viral disease is putting rabbits in a...


Expand title description text