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New Scientist

Mar 26 2022
Magazine

New Scientist covers the latest developments in science and technology that will impact your world. New Scientist employs and commissions the best writers in their fields from all over the world. Our editorial team provide cutting-edge news, award-winning features and reports, written in concise and clear language that puts discoveries and advances in the context of everyday life today and in the future.

Elsewhere on New Scientist

The new wave • Ending a global pandemic will require a global mindset

New Scientist

Extreme heat at the poles • The Arctic and Antarctic are both being warmed by hot air currents coming soon after historic sea ice lows, reports Adam Vaughan

The next big wave is coming • Cases of covid-19 are climbing sharply again, and China in particular faces a potential disaster if it fails to contain its biggest outbreak since 2020, reports Michael Le Page

Black hole paradox solution? • Black holes may not destroy all information about what they were originally made from, which would solve a major puzzle first described by Stephen Hawking, finds Leah Crane

Magnetic waves offer a window on Earth’s core

Complex octopus brains may have evolved like ours did

Eye in the sky is working well • The James Webb Space Telescope has sent back its clearest image yet

Genome project will show human diversity

Could I land a plane? Of course, I saw it on YouTube

Doubts cast on brain scanning research • Most studies are too small to make reliable conclusions about the neural basis for complex traits, says Clare Wilson

The first global energy crisis • The war in Ukraine has sent many nations scrambling for energy security. Adam Vaughan asks what it will look like

The oil and gas giants • A few nations dominate the export of oil and gas, and Russia is a big player in both industries

The price of bread

Our mixed messages can put wildlife in peril

Climate change may worsen hay fever

Bot that trots like an emu is extra efficient

Really brief

Asteroid spotted just before it struck Earth

AI scours psychedelic trip reports for medical clues

Bionic eye has ‘pupil’ that responds to light

History’s unsung heroes • The idea that modern science is a European invention ignores key global contributors. We need to acknowledge them, says James Poskett

No planet B • The spoils of war The Russian invasion of Ukraine is first and foremost a humanitarian catastrophe, but the environmental consequences will also be dire, writes Graham Lawton

Living rainbow

Your letters

The great bug robbery • The latest true-crime series to hit the small screen takes an intriguing heist just a little bit too seriously, says Elle Hunt

Eyes wide shut • A hallucinogenic light and art installation could reveal much about the nature of consciousness, finds Carissa Wong

Don’t miss

In the line of fire • An intimate portrait of a couple driven by adventure reveals lives well lived yet tragically cut short, finds Katie Smith-Wong

Playing with words • The key to explaining the many mysteries of language is to think of it as a game, say cognitive scientists Morten H. Christiansen and Nick Chater

How to be a better communicator

Inner strength • The pelvic floor is a vital part of the body that often gets ignored. Is it time for everyone to give theirs a workout, asks Nicola Jones

Childbirth conundrum

“Everyone should be able to see why science is so joyful” • In a world that tries to rob adults of their childlike wonder and curiosity, physicist and broadcaster Jim Al-Khalili has kept a firm hold of his throughout a 30-year career. He shares his secrets with Richard Webb

Planets...


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Frequency: Weekly Pages: 60 Publisher: New Scientist Ltd Edition: Mar 26 2022

OverDrive Magazine

  • Release date: March 24, 2022

Formats

OverDrive Magazine

subjects

Science

Languages

English

New Scientist covers the latest developments in science and technology that will impact your world. New Scientist employs and commissions the best writers in their fields from all over the world. Our editorial team provide cutting-edge news, award-winning features and reports, written in concise and clear language that puts discoveries and advances in the context of everyday life today and in the future.

Elsewhere on New Scientist

The new wave • Ending a global pandemic will require a global mindset

New Scientist

Extreme heat at the poles • The Arctic and Antarctic are both being warmed by hot air currents coming soon after historic sea ice lows, reports Adam Vaughan

The next big wave is coming • Cases of covid-19 are climbing sharply again, and China in particular faces a potential disaster if it fails to contain its biggest outbreak since 2020, reports Michael Le Page

Black hole paradox solution? • Black holes may not destroy all information about what they were originally made from, which would solve a major puzzle first described by Stephen Hawking, finds Leah Crane

Magnetic waves offer a window on Earth’s core

Complex octopus brains may have evolved like ours did

Eye in the sky is working well • The James Webb Space Telescope has sent back its clearest image yet

Genome project will show human diversity

Could I land a plane? Of course, I saw it on YouTube

Doubts cast on brain scanning research • Most studies are too small to make reliable conclusions about the neural basis for complex traits, says Clare Wilson

The first global energy crisis • The war in Ukraine has sent many nations scrambling for energy security. Adam Vaughan asks what it will look like

The oil and gas giants • A few nations dominate the export of oil and gas, and Russia is a big player in both industries

The price of bread

Our mixed messages can put wildlife in peril

Climate change may worsen hay fever

Bot that trots like an emu is extra efficient

Really brief

Asteroid spotted just before it struck Earth

AI scours psychedelic trip reports for medical clues

Bionic eye has ‘pupil’ that responds to light

History’s unsung heroes • The idea that modern science is a European invention ignores key global contributors. We need to acknowledge them, says James Poskett

No planet B • The spoils of war The Russian invasion of Ukraine is first and foremost a humanitarian catastrophe, but the environmental consequences will also be dire, writes Graham Lawton

Living rainbow

Your letters

The great bug robbery • The latest true-crime series to hit the small screen takes an intriguing heist just a little bit too seriously, says Elle Hunt

Eyes wide shut • A hallucinogenic light and art installation could reveal much about the nature of consciousness, finds Carissa Wong

Don’t miss

In the line of fire • An intimate portrait of a couple driven by adventure reveals lives well lived yet tragically cut short, finds Katie Smith-Wong

Playing with words • The key to explaining the many mysteries of language is to think of it as a game, say cognitive scientists Morten H. Christiansen and Nick Chater

How to be a better communicator

Inner strength • The pelvic floor is a vital part of the body that often gets ignored. Is it time for everyone to give theirs a workout, asks Nicola Jones

Childbirth conundrum

“Everyone should be able to see why science is so joyful” • In a world that tries to rob adults of their childlike wonder and curiosity, physicist and broadcaster Jim Al-Khalili has kept a firm hold of his throughout a 30-year career. He shares his secrets with Richard Webb

Planets...


Expand title description text