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New Scientist

Apr 30 2022
Magazine

New Scientist covers the latest developments in science and technology that will impact your world. New Scientist employs and commissions the best writers in their fields from all over the world. Our editorial team provide cutting-edge news, award-winning features and reports, written in concise and clear language that puts discoveries and advances in the context of everyday life today and in the future.

Elsewhere on New Scientist

Follow the pseudoscience • Politicians should stop using science-sounding concepts to sell unscientific policies

New Scientist

Severe Indian heatwave • Vulnerable people and wheat harvests are at risk from temperatures forecast to soar above 40°C, reports Adam Vaughan

Flawed asylum science • Scientific ways of determining the age of a person don’t exist, so UK plans to send adult asylum seekers abroad could put children at risk, reports Jason Arunn Murugesu

‘Selfish’ genetic sequences jumped from snakes to frogs via parasites

China still investing heavily in new coal-fired power plants

Insects and lab-grown meat could reduce food emissions by 80 per cent

Copper wire could achieve gigabit broadband speeds

DNA bases found in space rocks • We have now discovered all four building blocks of DNA in meteorite samples

Bloodworm’s copper fangs could inspire new materials

Spiders catapult after mating to escape death

We can tell how much CO2 in air is from burning fossil fuels

Tiny machine parts made of self-assembled proteins

Rock dust can help UK meet net-zero carbon removal goal

‘Viking skin’ nailed to medieval church doors in England is actually animal hide

Brakes instead of motors make robot arms more efficient

Surveillance drone saves power by crashing into walls

Global warming and farming may have already hit insects

Planetary scientists call for NASA missions to Uranus and Enceladus

Dolphins that are hand-fed by tourists become less social

Fossil skull hints feathers date back 250 million years

CRISPR used to treat brain cancer in mice

Leap forward for printing objects

Really brief

Campfire rock art could look animated

Mystery of weird ridges on Europa may have been solved

Synthetic nerve cells created in the lab

Say it loud and clear • The public needs to hear about science from the people who do it, without government spin getting in the way, argues Fiona Fox

This changes everything • The remote future Working from home might sound enticing, but a two-tier system is emerging in which it is valued less by employers. This division will only grow, warns Annalee Newitz

Inner space

Your letters

How physics shaped the world • This account of 12 significant discoveries in physics is detailed yet pacy – and has a cheering takeaway for the future, says Elle Hunt

Impossible murders • Elisabeth Moss is after a killer who is defying all known laws of reality in this unsettling sci-fi thriller, finds Bethan Ackerley

Don’t miss

The games column • Post-apocalyptic adventures Horizon Forbidden West continues the story of Aloy, a hunter in a future world ravaged by climate change and dominated by robotic animals. It is even better than its predecessor, says Jacob Aron

Ageing upturned • New insights into the ageing process show that growing older might not be a one-way street, reports Claire Ainsworth

Secrets of the immortal jellyfish

Bad dog! • Free-roaming canines and even pet dogs are taking a terrible toll on wildlife, as Aisling Irwin discovers

How to be an eco-friendly dog owner

Is it fair to keep a dog?

A new slant on the cosmos • The idea that the universe looks more or...


Expand title description text
Frequency: Weekly Pages: 60 Publisher: New Scientist Ltd Edition: Apr 30 2022

OverDrive Magazine

  • Release date: April 28, 2022

Formats

OverDrive Magazine

subjects

Science

Languages

English

New Scientist covers the latest developments in science and technology that will impact your world. New Scientist employs and commissions the best writers in their fields from all over the world. Our editorial team provide cutting-edge news, award-winning features and reports, written in concise and clear language that puts discoveries and advances in the context of everyday life today and in the future.

Elsewhere on New Scientist

Follow the pseudoscience • Politicians should stop using science-sounding concepts to sell unscientific policies

New Scientist

Severe Indian heatwave • Vulnerable people and wheat harvests are at risk from temperatures forecast to soar above 40°C, reports Adam Vaughan

Flawed asylum science • Scientific ways of determining the age of a person don’t exist, so UK plans to send adult asylum seekers abroad could put children at risk, reports Jason Arunn Murugesu

‘Selfish’ genetic sequences jumped from snakes to frogs via parasites

China still investing heavily in new coal-fired power plants

Insects and lab-grown meat could reduce food emissions by 80 per cent

Copper wire could achieve gigabit broadband speeds

DNA bases found in space rocks • We have now discovered all four building blocks of DNA in meteorite samples

Bloodworm’s copper fangs could inspire new materials

Spiders catapult after mating to escape death

We can tell how much CO2 in air is from burning fossil fuels

Tiny machine parts made of self-assembled proteins

Rock dust can help UK meet net-zero carbon removal goal

‘Viking skin’ nailed to medieval church doors in England is actually animal hide

Brakes instead of motors make robot arms more efficient

Surveillance drone saves power by crashing into walls

Global warming and farming may have already hit insects

Planetary scientists call for NASA missions to Uranus and Enceladus

Dolphins that are hand-fed by tourists become less social

Fossil skull hints feathers date back 250 million years

CRISPR used to treat brain cancer in mice

Leap forward for printing objects

Really brief

Campfire rock art could look animated

Mystery of weird ridges on Europa may have been solved

Synthetic nerve cells created in the lab

Say it loud and clear • The public needs to hear about science from the people who do it, without government spin getting in the way, argues Fiona Fox

This changes everything • The remote future Working from home might sound enticing, but a two-tier system is emerging in which it is valued less by employers. This division will only grow, warns Annalee Newitz

Inner space

Your letters

How physics shaped the world • This account of 12 significant discoveries in physics is detailed yet pacy – and has a cheering takeaway for the future, says Elle Hunt

Impossible murders • Elisabeth Moss is after a killer who is defying all known laws of reality in this unsettling sci-fi thriller, finds Bethan Ackerley

Don’t miss

The games column • Post-apocalyptic adventures Horizon Forbidden West continues the story of Aloy, a hunter in a future world ravaged by climate change and dominated by robotic animals. It is even better than its predecessor, says Jacob Aron

Ageing upturned • New insights into the ageing process show that growing older might not be a one-way street, reports Claire Ainsworth

Secrets of the immortal jellyfish

Bad dog! • Free-roaming canines and even pet dogs are taking a terrible toll on wildlife, as Aisling Irwin discovers

How to be an eco-friendly dog owner

Is it fair to keep a dog?

A new slant on the cosmos • The idea that the universe looks more or...


Expand title description text