Error loading page.
Try refreshing the page. If that doesn't work, there may be a network issue, and you can use our self test page to see what's preventing the page from loading.
Learn more about possible network issues or contact support for more help.

New Scientist

Jul 02 2022
Magazine

New Scientist covers the latest developments in science and technology that will impact your world. New Scientist employs and commissions the best writers in their fields from all over the world. Our editorial team provide cutting-edge news, award-winning features and reports, written in concise and clear language that puts discoveries and advances in the context of everyday life today and in the future.

Elsewhere on New Scientist

Eat yourself young • We are being promised a more appetising way to live longer – but will it work?

New Scientist

Roe v Wade is overturned • More than half of US states are now likely to ban abortion after the Supreme Court tore up a landmark ruling, reports Chelsea Whyte

Can monkeypox be controlled? • The ongoing outbreak is the biggest ever seen, but the UK has introduced a vaccination programme to help stem the spread among at-risk groups, reports Michael Le Page

UK could launch its own post-Brexit science programme in September

Accept we won’t meet 1.5°C climate target, says report

Glycaemic index doesn’t reliably predict blood sugar

Reddit saves millions by relying on unpaid moderators

Artificially intelligent robot perpetuates racist and sexist prejudices

Rogue planets with weird atmospheres could host life

Did warfare give rise to complex civilisations?

UK’s largest carbon capture project gets up and running

Top websites allow bad passwords • Analysis of popular English-language sites finds many don’t follow best security practices

Crop-eating stink bugs could be kept at bay by wasps

Bad candle reviews could help track covid-19 cases

UK plans launch of spacecraft to grab two dead satellites

What’s next for the CRISPR babies? • Three children in China who underwent CRISPR gene editing as embryos may need more healthcare over their lifetimes, but shouldn’t become a science project, finds Nicolas Gutierrez C.

The next generation

Giant bacteria that are visible to the naked eye upend microbiology

Light delayed by seven years by galaxy cluster

Tiny hummingbirds top the chart for plumage colours

New sign of strange neutron material

Cancer cells spread more when sleeping

Really brief

Protein in faux meat less easily absorbed

Stone axes turn out to be the oldest found in the UK

Chimps can find their way in a digital world

A lighter touch • New guidelines recommending abstinence from alcohol in pregnancy may do more harm than good, says Jules Montague

My botanical life • To market, to market Plant-ripened fruit and veg are packed with more nutrients than produce harvested early for bulk sales. Let’s celebrate farmers’ markets, says Beronda L. Montgomery

Natural wonders

Your letters

Bridging the great divide • The argument that it is possible to find common ground with those holding diametrically opposing views is a tonic, finds Chris Stokel-Walker

A very particular story • A brilliant book about the discovery of the Higgs boson isn’t for the faint-hearted, finds Simon Ings

Don’t miss

The sci-fi column • Bring on the new What would the world be like if men suddenly disappeared? That is the premise of a new science-fiction novel from Sandra Newman that leaves us wondering what it really takes to change history, says Sally Adee

Age-defying food • There is no shortage of advice about healthy eating, but is there really a diet that can make you live longer? Graham Lawton reports

The longevity diet

Uncharted territory • Ten years after the discovery of the Higgs boson became front-page news, particle physics is shaking off a long malaise to begin a new age of exploration, finds Harry...


Expand title description text
Frequency: Weekly Pages: 60 Publisher: New Scientist Ltd Edition: Jul 02 2022

OverDrive Magazine

  • Release date: June 30, 2022

Formats

OverDrive Magazine

subjects

Science

Languages

English

New Scientist covers the latest developments in science and technology that will impact your world. New Scientist employs and commissions the best writers in their fields from all over the world. Our editorial team provide cutting-edge news, award-winning features and reports, written in concise and clear language that puts discoveries and advances in the context of everyday life today and in the future.

Elsewhere on New Scientist

Eat yourself young • We are being promised a more appetising way to live longer – but will it work?

New Scientist

Roe v Wade is overturned • More than half of US states are now likely to ban abortion after the Supreme Court tore up a landmark ruling, reports Chelsea Whyte

Can monkeypox be controlled? • The ongoing outbreak is the biggest ever seen, but the UK has introduced a vaccination programme to help stem the spread among at-risk groups, reports Michael Le Page

UK could launch its own post-Brexit science programme in September

Accept we won’t meet 1.5°C climate target, says report

Glycaemic index doesn’t reliably predict blood sugar

Reddit saves millions by relying on unpaid moderators

Artificially intelligent robot perpetuates racist and sexist prejudices

Rogue planets with weird atmospheres could host life

Did warfare give rise to complex civilisations?

UK’s largest carbon capture project gets up and running

Top websites allow bad passwords • Analysis of popular English-language sites finds many don’t follow best security practices

Crop-eating stink bugs could be kept at bay by wasps

Bad candle reviews could help track covid-19 cases

UK plans launch of spacecraft to grab two dead satellites

What’s next for the CRISPR babies? • Three children in China who underwent CRISPR gene editing as embryos may need more healthcare over their lifetimes, but shouldn’t become a science project, finds Nicolas Gutierrez C.

The next generation

Giant bacteria that are visible to the naked eye upend microbiology

Light delayed by seven years by galaxy cluster

Tiny hummingbirds top the chart for plumage colours

New sign of strange neutron material

Cancer cells spread more when sleeping

Really brief

Protein in faux meat less easily absorbed

Stone axes turn out to be the oldest found in the UK

Chimps can find their way in a digital world

A lighter touch • New guidelines recommending abstinence from alcohol in pregnancy may do more harm than good, says Jules Montague

My botanical life • To market, to market Plant-ripened fruit and veg are packed with more nutrients than produce harvested early for bulk sales. Let’s celebrate farmers’ markets, says Beronda L. Montgomery

Natural wonders

Your letters

Bridging the great divide • The argument that it is possible to find common ground with those holding diametrically opposing views is a tonic, finds Chris Stokel-Walker

A very particular story • A brilliant book about the discovery of the Higgs boson isn’t for the faint-hearted, finds Simon Ings

Don’t miss

The sci-fi column • Bring on the new What would the world be like if men suddenly disappeared? That is the premise of a new science-fiction novel from Sandra Newman that leaves us wondering what it really takes to change history, says Sally Adee

Age-defying food • There is no shortage of advice about healthy eating, but is there really a diet that can make you live longer? Graham Lawton reports

The longevity diet

Uncharted territory • Ten years after the discovery of the Higgs boson became front-page news, particle physics is shaking off a long malaise to begin a new age of exploration, finds Harry...


Expand title description text