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New Scientist

Oct 01 2022
Magazine

New Scientist covers the latest developments in science and technology that will impact your world. New Scientist employs and commissions the best writers in their fields from all over the world. Our editorial team provide cutting-edge news, award-winning features and reports, written in concise and clear language that puts discoveries and advances in the context of everyday life today and in the future.

Elsewhere on New Scientist

A note from the editor

No one size fits all • Progress on insomnia suggests we need a more nuanced approach to mental health

New Scientist

Alarm at UK growth push • Environmentalists are raising concerns over government plans for development that they fear will hit nature, reports Michael Le Page

Analysis Brazil election • Decision time for the Amazon If Brazil re-elects Jair Bolsonaro as president, the impact on the rainforest could be catastrophic, while his rival Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva is promising to reverse environmental damage, reports Luke Taylor

Gene therapy infused into the brain eases debilitating rare condition

Hot electron bubble whizzes around our galaxy’s black hole

Decarbonising shipping will cost more than $1 trillion

Blood vessel web protects the brain of a swimming whale

Neptune on display • A stunning view of the planet’s rarely seen ring system from JWST

Robot navigates rooms using magnetic fields

Genes may raise chronic fatigue risk • Almost 200 genetic variants were identified in 91 per cent of people with the condition

The recipe for perfect bubbles, according to science

Radio wave attack makes cameras see phantom images

Guatemala’s decimated rainforest is on the mend

Moss from Earth could grow under the light of another star

Sperm move in packs to push through vaginal fluid

Fears of AI-driven global disaster • A third of scientists working in AI say it could cause catastrophe on the scale of nuclear war

Mutation that helps bowhead whale live longer shrinks testes

Analysis Wildlife • Unsustainable conservation Cheetahs have been reintroduced to India for the first time in 70 years, but the project has drawn criticism, reports Lou Del Bello

Fireball traced to space rock that made it

Enceladus has all life’s key elements • Reanalysis of icy rock grains has revealed presence of phosphorus from Saturn’s moon

Your gut microbes may affect how ill malaria makes you

Maxwell’s demon device could help explain entropy

Tree-hugging lemurs are trying to beat the heat

US grid may buckle under switch to EVs

Historical migration dispute looks settled

Glimmer of hope in the battle to save the banana

Really brief

Snouting around • Keystone species such as wild boar may be far better conservationists than humans. We must cherish them, says Benedict Macdonald

Field notes from space-time • On a cosmic schedule I work on the dark matter problem knowing it may be solved long after I die. The universe doesn’t cater to human timelines, says Chanda Prescod-Weinstein

Salt of the Earth

Editor’s pick

Dancing towards a new future? • Who will we become in a transhuman world? A new dance work uses motion capture and beguiling visuals to explore further, says Alexandra Thompson

Rare seeds of hope • As agriculture becomes more industrialised, saving unusual vegetables from extinction is vital, finds Chris Stokel-Walker

Don’t miss

The film column • Really in it together In All That Breathes, a compelling documentary set in Delhi, humans are just another animal – alongside pigs, black kites, rats, mosquitoes and millipedes – struggling to survive during a global emergency, finds Simon Ings

Rest...


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Frequency: Weekly Pages: 60 Publisher: New Scientist Ltd Edition: Oct 01 2022

OverDrive Magazine

  • Release date: September 29, 2022

Formats

OverDrive Magazine

subjects

Science

Languages

English

New Scientist covers the latest developments in science and technology that will impact your world. New Scientist employs and commissions the best writers in their fields from all over the world. Our editorial team provide cutting-edge news, award-winning features and reports, written in concise and clear language that puts discoveries and advances in the context of everyday life today and in the future.

Elsewhere on New Scientist

A note from the editor

No one size fits all • Progress on insomnia suggests we need a more nuanced approach to mental health

New Scientist

Alarm at UK growth push • Environmentalists are raising concerns over government plans for development that they fear will hit nature, reports Michael Le Page

Analysis Brazil election • Decision time for the Amazon If Brazil re-elects Jair Bolsonaro as president, the impact on the rainforest could be catastrophic, while his rival Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva is promising to reverse environmental damage, reports Luke Taylor

Gene therapy infused into the brain eases debilitating rare condition

Hot electron bubble whizzes around our galaxy’s black hole

Decarbonising shipping will cost more than $1 trillion

Blood vessel web protects the brain of a swimming whale

Neptune on display • A stunning view of the planet’s rarely seen ring system from JWST

Robot navigates rooms using magnetic fields

Genes may raise chronic fatigue risk • Almost 200 genetic variants were identified in 91 per cent of people with the condition

The recipe for perfect bubbles, according to science

Radio wave attack makes cameras see phantom images

Guatemala’s decimated rainforest is on the mend

Moss from Earth could grow under the light of another star

Sperm move in packs to push through vaginal fluid

Fears of AI-driven global disaster • A third of scientists working in AI say it could cause catastrophe on the scale of nuclear war

Mutation that helps bowhead whale live longer shrinks testes

Analysis Wildlife • Unsustainable conservation Cheetahs have been reintroduced to India for the first time in 70 years, but the project has drawn criticism, reports Lou Del Bello

Fireball traced to space rock that made it

Enceladus has all life’s key elements • Reanalysis of icy rock grains has revealed presence of phosphorus from Saturn’s moon

Your gut microbes may affect how ill malaria makes you

Maxwell’s demon device could help explain entropy

Tree-hugging lemurs are trying to beat the heat

US grid may buckle under switch to EVs

Historical migration dispute looks settled

Glimmer of hope in the battle to save the banana

Really brief

Snouting around • Keystone species such as wild boar may be far better conservationists than humans. We must cherish them, says Benedict Macdonald

Field notes from space-time • On a cosmic schedule I work on the dark matter problem knowing it may be solved long after I die. The universe doesn’t cater to human timelines, says Chanda Prescod-Weinstein

Salt of the Earth

Editor’s pick

Dancing towards a new future? • Who will we become in a transhuman world? A new dance work uses motion capture and beguiling visuals to explore further, says Alexandra Thompson

Rare seeds of hope • As agriculture becomes more industrialised, saving unusual vegetables from extinction is vital, finds Chris Stokel-Walker

Don’t miss

The film column • Really in it together In All That Breathes, a compelling documentary set in Delhi, humans are just another animal – alongside pigs, black kites, rats, mosquitoes and millipedes – struggling to survive during a global emergency, finds Simon Ings

Rest...


Expand title description text