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New Scientist

May 28 2022
Magazine

New Scientist covers the latest developments in science and technology that will impact your world. New Scientist employs and commissions the best writers in their fields from all over the world. Our editorial team provide cutting-edge news, award-winning features and reports, written in concise and clear language that puts discoveries and advances in the context of everyday life today and in the future.

Elsewhere on New Scientist

The nuclear question • Nuclear power’s promise remains elusive, and a massive issue remains: who pays?

New Scientist

Monkeypox on the rise • Reported cases are growing rapidly in the largest known outbreak outside of Central and West Africa, reports Jason Arunn Murugesu

Monkeypox: Key questions answered • Cases are rising worldwide, leaving some people anxious that the virus could evolve into a pandemic alongside covid-19. Michael Le Page addresses monkeypox’s risks

Australia votes for climate action in ‘greenslide’ election

Priceless samples from Ukraine’s seed bank destroyed in Russian attack

ISS docking success for Boeing’s Starliner spacecraft

Tomatoes gene-edited to produce vitamin D

UK expects to be a net electricity exporter by 2030

Is this black hole picture wrong? • The first ever image of a black hole, at the centre of the galaxy M87, showed a bright outer ring of light in line with predictions, but a new analysis suggests that may not be accurate, reports Leah Crane

Climate change means people are losing 44 hours of sleep per year

A taste of urine helps dolphins spot their friends

A breakthrough moment for AI? • UK firm DeepMind has released Gato, an AI that can perform 600 tasks – but it isn’t truly intelligent, finds Matthew Sparkes

Plantations grow better if they contain many species of tree

Tackling the global food crisis • Geopolitical events and climate change are making food unaffordable across the planet. What can be done, asks Michael Le Page

The fertiliser problem

Recycle old wood into a material stronger than steel

Lives of reef fish cut short by boat noise

Post-infection jab cuts long covid risk

Really brief

Young wasps turn cannibal in the nest

Amphibious drone can fly, swim and cling to things

Fruity smell in urine stresses male mice

It’s a dog’s life • Research now supports what Darwin asserted 150 years ago – dogs feel things like we do. Legislation needs to catch up, says Jules Howard

This changes everything • The US myth of free speech Elon Musk claims he wants to buy Twitter to save free speech, but it is a fallacy that we should be able to say whatever we want, argues Annalee Newitz

Blubber buffet

Your letters

Why wasps need more love • An exuberant and authoritative book puts wasps in their rightful place – at the centre of research, says Simon Ings

When we can talk to the animals

After the Romans • Who were the Anglo-Saxons? A smart, humane book digs deep to re-examine their true origins, finds Michael Marshall

Don’t miss

The games column • Imagination rules This lo-fi role-playing game set aboard a decrepit space station sees you play as a Sleeper, a human mind in a robot body. Exploring multiple storylines helps you create a fantastic sci-fi tapestry, says Jacob Aron

The nuclear option • An indispensable way to meet our climate goals or unnecessary and unconscionable? What should we think about nuclear energy, asks Michael Brooks

THE WEAPONS CONNECTION

NUCLEAR BUT NIMBLE

THE WASTE PROBLEM

What causes what? • A new way to look at cause and effect could transform our view of biology – and shed new light on the question of free will, finds Philip...


Expand title description text

subjects

Science

Languages

English

New Scientist covers the latest developments in science and technology that will impact your world. New Scientist employs and commissions the best writers in their fields from all over the world. Our editorial team provide cutting-edge news, award-winning features and reports, written in concise and clear language that puts discoveries and advances in the context of everyday life today and in the future.

Elsewhere on New Scientist

The nuclear question • Nuclear power’s promise remains elusive, and a massive issue remains: who pays?

New Scientist

Monkeypox on the rise • Reported cases are growing rapidly in the largest known outbreak outside of Central and West Africa, reports Jason Arunn Murugesu

Monkeypox: Key questions answered • Cases are rising worldwide, leaving some people anxious that the virus could evolve into a pandemic alongside covid-19. Michael Le Page addresses monkeypox’s risks

Australia votes for climate action in ‘greenslide’ election

Priceless samples from Ukraine’s seed bank destroyed in Russian attack

ISS docking success for Boeing’s Starliner spacecraft

Tomatoes gene-edited to produce vitamin D

UK expects to be a net electricity exporter by 2030

Is this black hole picture wrong? • The first ever image of a black hole, at the centre of the galaxy M87, showed a bright outer ring of light in line with predictions, but a new analysis suggests that may not be accurate, reports Leah Crane

Climate change means people are losing 44 hours of sleep per year

A taste of urine helps dolphins spot their friends

A breakthrough moment for AI? • UK firm DeepMind has released Gato, an AI that can perform 600 tasks – but it isn’t truly intelligent, finds Matthew Sparkes

Plantations grow better if they contain many species of tree

Tackling the global food crisis • Geopolitical events and climate change are making food unaffordable across the planet. What can be done, asks Michael Le Page

The fertiliser problem

Recycle old wood into a material stronger than steel

Lives of reef fish cut short by boat noise

Post-infection jab cuts long covid risk

Really brief

Young wasps turn cannibal in the nest

Amphibious drone can fly, swim and cling to things

Fruity smell in urine stresses male mice

It’s a dog’s life • Research now supports what Darwin asserted 150 years ago – dogs feel things like we do. Legislation needs to catch up, says Jules Howard

This changes everything • The US myth of free speech Elon Musk claims he wants to buy Twitter to save free speech, but it is a fallacy that we should be able to say whatever we want, argues Annalee Newitz

Blubber buffet

Your letters

Why wasps need more love • An exuberant and authoritative book puts wasps in their rightful place – at the centre of research, says Simon Ings

When we can talk to the animals

After the Romans • Who were the Anglo-Saxons? A smart, humane book digs deep to re-examine their true origins, finds Michael Marshall

Don’t miss

The games column • Imagination rules This lo-fi role-playing game set aboard a decrepit space station sees you play as a Sleeper, a human mind in a robot body. Exploring multiple storylines helps you create a fantastic sci-fi tapestry, says Jacob Aron

The nuclear option • An indispensable way to meet our climate goals or unnecessary and unconscionable? What should we think about nuclear energy, asks Michael Brooks

THE WEAPONS CONNECTION

NUCLEAR BUT NIMBLE

THE WASTE PROBLEM

What causes what? • A new way to look at cause and effect could transform our view of biology – and shed new light on the question of free will, finds Philip...


Expand title description text